September232014
rejectedjokes:

An enormous thank you to Joe Berkowitz for writing such an awesome article about me for Co.Create! I’ve never had anyone ask me so many questions about how I hustled from the beginning to now and it was so much fun remembering it all. Enjoy the article by clicking the photo above or BY CLICKING HERE.

This is a really great interview with Ben Schwartz about how he got where he is today. UCB students always ask how you make it in this business, and besides talent and luck, there is above all, hard work. I don’t know anyone who has done well in this business who doesn’t work their ass off for what they have. (At this point students get sort of sad and ask if there is another way to make it. Then I tell them “No.”) Ben is obviously incredibly talented but also perhaps one of the most hard-working and dedicated actors and writers I know, and this shows how much work you have to do to have the kind of career Ben has. 

rejectedjokes:

An enormous thank you to Joe Berkowitz for writing such an awesome article about me for Co.Create! I’ve never had anyone ask me so many questions about how I hustled from the beginning to now and it was so much fun remembering it all. Enjoy the article by clicking the photo above or BY CLICKING HERE.

This is a really great interview with Ben Schwartz about how he got where he is today. UCB students always ask how you make it in this business, and besides talent and luck, there is above all, hard work. I don’t know anyone who has done well in this business who doesn’t work their ass off for what they have. (At this point students get sort of sad and ask if there is another way to make it. Then I tell them “No.”)

Ben is obviously incredibly talented but also perhaps one of the most hard-working and dedicated actors and writers I know, and this shows how much work you have to do to have the kind of career Ben has. 

September162014
September62014

Anonymous said: The improv company I'm in has a team of 7-8 who are responsible for festival shows and a big monthly show at one of my city's biggest theatres. Half of them are selfish, ungenerous performers but are consistently given stage time because they're the senior members. It's really demoralizing as a newer performer (5 years) to see terrible, under-rehearsed work rewarded, especially when attendance at our shows has flagged over the last few years, but how do you tell the house team that they suck?

improvnonsense:

You don’t. Worry about your own work and move on when there’s a chance. It’s not your show, so don’t try to direct it from your head. 

Do the people on the team share your opinion? Probably not, so don’t worry about them. Does the audience like the shows? If not, the show won’t survive. But if the audience does — which I suspect they do — then try and figure out what the show is doing right.

You sound like people who complain that SNL is a bad show. It’s easy to find people who wonder out loud “How can that show be rewarded with its long term success when it (pick one: focuses so much on dumb pop culture, caters to a young audience, runs popular characters into the ground with little variation)?” Rather than figuring out why it is that SNL is the most successful sketch show in American (world?) history (ah, it focuses on the pop culture everyone is talking about, it’s one of the few shows with talent catering to a young audience, it repeats its popular characters).

What I’m saying: You’re being too harsh. The judge who lives in your brain is being given too much power. It will turn on you in times of low confidence and you won’t be able to recover and you’ll quit. Practice compassion and empathy. This paragraph is perhaps too new agey to be accepted at face value, but I suggest you take this advice if you want to be happy doing creative things.

POST SCRIPT (added a few hours after posting): Ugh, I jumped on this in too hostile a manner, which is hypocritical. Though I mean what I say above I want to add that I am sympathetic with the frustration this person expresses. It is frustrating to see people take for granted a good show or a good time slot, etc. I do understand that. But the “judge” thing I speak of —- I know this from experience. If you indulge the part of your brain that is scanning someone else’s show and demanding that it be improved or fixed and wanting to punish those who fall short — that part of your brain will get stronger and turn on you in ways you do not realize. This is the same point but I wanted to add that I also have the feelings you express but I’ve learned they are a red flag to be dealt with in my head for my own sake!

August292014

quintessentiallyquirky:

The full gif set is so much better. All hail, Queen Amy.

(Source: amypoehler, via khealywu)

August222014

mattfisher:

whileyouweresleeping:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

Boom. 

— From NYC.

The Brown University graduation ceremony ends with the university president tattooing this across your shoulder blades.

It does take a while.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via weaziller77)

1AM

In hard-to-find footage, the comic powerhouse Phil Hartman is supported by the Saturday Night Live Family singers, as they sing an altered version of “So Long, Farewell” from The Sound of Music. Cast members perform as their recurring characters, until only Chris Farley is left as motivational speaker Matt Foley. Farley falls asleep onstage, nuzzled tightly into Hartman’s shoulder. The spotlight tightens around the two, Hartman’s voice cracking with emotion as he sings his final goodbyes, the camera eventually fading away into the distance [x] | May 14, 1994

(Source: oh-whiskers, via frankhejl)

August212014
fuckyeahvintage-retro:

A taxicab prowls through the abandoned streets of NYC’s SoHo.
1960s © Steve Baldwin

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

A taxicab prowls through the abandoned streets of NYC’s SoHo.

1960s © Steve Baldwin

1AM
1AM

mvgl:

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 2x09 - “Cased Up” (November 11, 1991)

(via nicolebyer)

August142014
hallekiefer:

newsweek:

Huffington Post, Washington Post Reporters Arrested in Ferguson
Two reporters covering ongoing protests in Ferguson, Missouri, reported on Twitter that they were arrested by police Wednesday evening. The Huffington Post’s Ryan Reilly and Wesley Lowery of The Washington Post said they had been working in a McDonald’s restaurant in Ferguson when police entered and told them to leave. According to Lowery, he and Reilly were arrested for not leaving quickly enough, and for taping police. Both reporters were released without charges, Lowery said.
Unrest has pervaded Ferguson since a police officer killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown on Saturday.

Oh christ

hallekiefer:

newsweek:

Huffington Post, Washington Post Reporters Arrested in Ferguson

Two reporters covering ongoing protests in Ferguson, Missouri, reported on Twitter that they were arrested by police Wednesday evening. The Huffington Post’s Ryan Reilly and Wesley Lowery of The Washington Post said they had been working in a McDonald’s restaurant in Ferguson when police entered and told them to leave. According to Lowery, he and Reilly were arrested for not leaving quickly enough, and for taping police. Both reporters were released without charges, Lowery said.

Unrest has pervaded Ferguson since a police officer killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown on Saturday.

Oh christ

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